X. SOUTH CAROLINA MCCORDS IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Barnard McCord settled in Charleston SC in 1720 and Captain John McCord in the 1750's headed a company of Scotch-Irish militia in the French and Indian War. Three major victories for Washington occurred in the South, in SC, the June 1776 victory at Charleston in which Scotch-Irish prevented a major British landing, the 1780 Battle of Kings Mountain, and the Battle of Cowpens in 1781. In all three, Scotch-Irish patriots played a major role in these victories which were Washington's greatest in the South before his final victory at Yorktown VA in the fall 1781.

SOUTHERN BRITISH SETTLEMENTS IN 1700

North and South Carolinas split into two separate colonies in 1712

Bernard McCord was in Charleston, South Carolina by 1720.

Other McCords were in South Carolina including John McCord, trader to the Indians in 1750.

Trader McCord as Captain John McCord headed a Frontier Ranger Company in South Carolina at the time of the French and Indian War of the 1750's.

South Carolina was the scene of some bitter fighting during the American Revolution and there was fighting at McCord's Ferry, named after the Captain John McCord just mentioned.

JOHN MCCORD JR WHOSE FATHER JOHANNES MCCORD, WAS FROM ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA

One of the McCords from South Carolina in the Revolutionary War was a 13-year old teenager, John McCord Jr.

In February 1756, "eight families, Presbyterian in faith, emigrated from Pennsylvania to upper parts of Virginia and North Carolina (and) moved further southward to..." a settlement known as Long Cane in the wide-ranging Abbeville District of South Carolina.

"John McCord of Albemarle County, Virginia here settled sometime prior to the Revolutionary War....in the will of his father (Johannes McCord of Virginia) written March 2, 1764 he was to inherit the home plantation on Moorman's River (in Albemarle County). He apparently did not long remain there, for it was only a few years later that he would appear in Abbeville."

"John McCord Jr of Abbeville in his application (for Revolutionary War pension) definitely links the Abbeville family to the Albemarle one when he declares he was born in Albemarle County, Virginia November 25, 1763 and that the record of his age was in a Bible belonging to his brother James McCord of Abbeville District, and was in the handwriting of either his father or his uncle. In (his) will John refers to Bibl(e) etc."

"From Howe's Presbyterians in South Carolina we learn that the elders in the Upper Long Cane Church in the years 1785-97 were Andrew (later General ) Pickens, John McCord, Andrew Hamilton, Hugh Read, Edward Parr and perhaps others. Robert Hall was the pastor."

"The Revolutionary war record of John McCord, Jr. who in 1776 and at the age of 13 volunteered for service in a militia camp commanded by Capt. Joseph Pickens gives a good description of his duties during that war. The following paragraph is taken from his application for pension.

" ' It was observed that the young soldier was both young and slender of frame and weak habit of body and he was asked to give to a more able-bodied soldier his rifle, powder horn and shot bag. The young soldier was then given light duties such as shelling corn, carrying it to the mill, returning with it in meal, procuring other provisions, assisting in driving and bringing in beeves to the soldiers, superintending the provision stores, attending on prisoner and on the sick when necessary, going (with) messages, etc.'

"Later John McCord Jr served in a corps raided by General Pickens for the express purpose of guarding the public stores and property of the militia at the Block House, and in his last tour of duty John McCord was called upon by General Pickens to constitute one of a bodyguard from Abbeville District (or Ninety Six) to a place called Tolls Station on the Saluda River.

"John McCord Jr., age 69, applied for his pension in Abbeville October 34, 1832 and nine years later, C.A. Bradford, an attorney of Pontotoc, Mississippi in a letter to the pension office dated February 23, 1841 made inquiry" about his client, John McCord's, pension. He said John McCord "formerly resided in S.C."

"It is said that John McCord Sr of Abbeville saw service in the American Revolution. He may have been a member of the militia of his district, as in 1779 Colonel Pickens had command of the Block House in charge of Captain Anderson while he was absent raising a Whig (Patriot) militia in his district.

"When Boyd crossed into Georgia, Pickens leading 300 Whigs pursued him and overtook him at Kettle Creek, and in that severe battle Boyd was killed and his superior forces were defeated."

JOHN MCCORD SR, SON OF JOHN MCCORD, TRADER TO THE INDIANS

There was a Captain John McCord who served with General Thomas ( "The Gamecock') Sumter of South Carolina in May 1781. A British writer, Levi Smith writing in the Royal Gazette of April 13, 1782, reprinted in the Political Magazine, London, June 1782, wrote,

"When Thomas Sumter invested Orangeburg in May 1781 and got possession of a very strong post, a great quantity of provisions and other stores which were found in it. Of the prisoners taken, 29 Tories were then placed in charge of Captain John McCord and marched in irons for the prison camp at headquarters."

The Battle at McCord's Ferry, South Carolina

In a letter from D.J. McCord to J.S. McCord dated March 1846, he wrote, "it was about this time that British Troops under Tarleton when crossing the river, burned Mrs. McCord's house and everything in it."

"On September 3, 1785 John McCord's name is on a list of creditors of the State for militia services, supplies to the State and horses lost in public service," according to an account audited by the Historical Commission of South Carolina. He had died before the end of July. David McCord, executor, sold his effects etc. at McCord's Ferry. His mother, Sophinisba McCord died on September 25, 1784, according to a newspaper notice by Langdon Cheves.

"David McCord married Mary Howell, grand-daughter of Thomas Howell and his wife Grace...he is said to have done military service under his uncle Colonel William Thomson who commanded the 3rd Regiment.

He (David) lived in Richland County near McCords Ferry. He became a Colonel of the militia and served as a member of the state legislature. He died circa 1801 and is buried in the family burying ground near McCord's Ferry. His will is dated May 17, 1801 and is witnessed by Joseph McCord."

"It is believed that Joseph McCord who married Martha Turquand went to Alabama where he is buried at Benton, the home of his nephew, Russell Paul McCord."


Another McCord relative, Pendleton Isbell, who is related through Stephen McCord Brown's father, was in George Washington's personal honor guard, a select group of men who traveled with and protected General Washington. Stephen is descended from Joseph McCord of the family of John McCord of Abbeville, S.C.


THE AMERICAN VICTORY AT CHARLESTON SOUTH CAROLINA IN JUNE 1776

There was much other fighting in South Carolina early in the war also.

At Charleston, South Carolina, in June 1776, General John Armstrong of Pennsylvania and his frontiersmen with their long rifles waited on Hadrian's Point, adjoining Charleston, for a huge landing of British troops aboard ships anchored there.

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

On June 28, 1776, Brigadier General (later Major General) John Armstrong of Carlisle, Pennsylvania with 500 frontier Continental riflemen and Pennsylvania Associator militiamen, Virginia's Lee with his frontiersmen, and the South Carolina militia with their long rifles and cannon, located at Hadrian's Point, carefully picked off men aboard eleven British ships carrying some 6000 troops in 1776 which were anchored in Charleston Harbor near Ft. Moultrie, trying to disembark there and invade the South.

This was a major invasion fleet. General John Armstrong and the others won a major victory against the British at that time.

The British losses were so great from the deadly accurate firing of Armstrong's and General Lee's men of Virginia, and the South Carolina militia, so much so that the British finally gave up and departed without proceeding further with the landing which had already started. The British then aborted the landing and headed north toward New York, giving up invading the South.

"The (British) fleet withdrew badly crippled...from the fire (which had occurred) with remarkable accuracy."

Had the British landed their force, they could well have split the South off from the North and defeated George Washington.

That split was a key part of the British strategy during the Revolution. They were never successful in being able to pull it off, try as they may.

(Charleston was also the first battle of the Civil War in the 1860's.)

CHARLESTON S.C. HARBOR IN 1739


THE AMERICAN VICTORY AT MOORE'S BRIDGE SOUTH CAROLINA IN 1776

At Moore's Bridge in South Carolina, located near the coast, in early 1776 also, Scotch-Irish troops outnumbered by loyalist troops, waited overnight for the loyalists to cross Moore's Bridge in the daylight next morning.

When the loyalists came to the bridge the next morning, they found that the shrewd Scotch-Irish frontiersmen had during the night removed the wooden cross pieces on the bridge, leaving only the two lengthwise railings which normally held the cross pieces in place.

When the loyalists tried to cross on the railings, they found the railings had been greased by the Scotch-Irish patriots during the night. The patriots with their long rifles on the other side then carefully picked off so many of them as they tried to cross that the loyalists finally fled in defeat .


THE THREE MAJOR VICTORIES IN THE SOUTH FOR THE REVOLUTIONARIES

MONUMENT AT KINGS MOUNTAIN, S.C.

THE TWO MAJOR LATER VICTORIES OF WASHINGTON'S ARMY IN THE SOUTH BEFORE YORKTOWN: THE BATTLE OF KINGS MOUNTAIN AND THE BATTLE OF COWPENS, BOTH IN SOUTH CAROLINA, BOTH WON MAINLY BY FRONTIER RIFLEMEN

A map showing Washington's pincer's movement at Yorktown, Virginia on 19 October 1781 which trapped the British, followed frontiersmen's successes at The Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780 and The Battle of Cowpens in 1781, both in South Carolina.

The three greatest victories of Washington's army in the South during the Revolution involved frontiersmen, mostly Scotch-Irish. One victory was this victory at Kings Mountain, South Carolina, another was at The Battle of Cowpens in South Carolina, and the one just described at Charleston in June 1776.

The battle at Kings Mountain was a smashing victory won by Colonel John Sevier's frontiersmen from Washington County, Tennessee (then in North Carolina) and Colonel Shelby's from Sullivan County and General William Campbell's frontiersmen from Southwest Virginia, located on the present border of Tennessee. They were joined by South Carolina's General, Scotch-Irish Andrew Pickens, who was originally from Derry, Pennsylvania, and his troops at Kings Mountain and other local militia.

In a forced march over the mountains from their homes in Tennessee and Southwest Virginia, Sevier, Isaac Shelby, and Campbell's sharpshooters cut off British troops at Kings Mountain and in tree-to-tree fighting at that mountain completely defeated the British on October 7, 1780.

It was a major victory. The frontiersmen "killed or captured 1000 hard-fighting British Tories there." The leader of the British troops, Patrick Ferguson was killed in the battle .

Then, shortly thereafter, "Virginia's Daniel Morgan defeated 'Bloody' Tarleton" at The Battle of Cowpens on January 17,1781 in Western South Carolina.

THE BRITISH LEADER "BLOODY" BANASTRE TARLETON, WHO GENERAL MORGAN TOTALLY DEFEATED AT THE BATTLE OF COWPENS, SOUTH CAROLINA

Cowpens was a brilliantly-led victory by Brigadier General Daniel Morgan with his Valley of Virginia frontiersmen sharpshooters. His strategy of feints and planned withdrawals with his infantry resulted in his entrapment of the British there with his frontier cavalry and infantry, a well-planned and successful strategy.

THE BATTLE OF COWPENS, S.C. JANUARY 17, 1781

General Daniel Morgan outgeneraled the British forces at Cowpens led by the Britisher "Bloody" Banastre Tarleton who had theretofore given no mercy to the Americans he defeated and had put to the sword many of those he captured or had defeated who were helpless and unable to defend themselves. He was brutal.

Morgan's Rifle and Cavalry Regiment has been described as the most decorated unit in Washington's army during the Revolution.

Morgan used his two forces, cavalry and infantry, in brilliant strategy, the riflemen as the point men in the beginning of a battle to draw the enemy's troops towards them, then withdrawing for an ambush by Morgan's cavalrymen who swooped down on the enemy, supported by the infantry who had set up the ambush and then again attacked. Morgan was an old hand with this strategy.

General Daniel Morgan, earlier in The Battle of Saratoga, New York on October 17, 1777, had at the beginning of the battle positioned one of his best sharpshooter snipers in a tree on the battlefield. He described to the sharpshooter how British General Simon Fraser was dressed and told him that when he saw him to take him out of the battle.

The sniper did as Morgan directed, which, together with the ferocity with which Morgan's men fought, contributed to the defeat there of the British in which they captured some 4900 of British soldiers defeated principally by Morgan's men. General Fraser's death by the sniper left the British forces in confusion and Morgan's men attacked.

General Morgan had seen at the defeat of British General Braddock in 1755 how, when the leading general was killed, as Braddock was there, the men were left in disarray. Morgan took advantage of this strategy and repeated it at Saratoga.

These two 1780 and 1781 victories, Kings Mountain and Cowpens, gave a great morale boost and support to Washington's forces in the North. When the British moved north toward them into Virginia, Washington marshaled his forces and those of the French and trapped and defeated British General Cornwallis at Yorktown, the battle which won the War for Independence. in October 1781.


SOUTH CAROLINA'S BEAUTIFUL BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS IN THE WEST

The Blue Ridge mountains run all the way from Virginia in the North to South Carolina in the South.